Memorial To The Unborn

St. Germaine, Prescott Valley, AZ

What is a Memorial to the Unborn?  They have been popping up all over in the last number of years.  Ranging from a simple headstone in a flower bed, to small parks at the side of a church, to Facebook pages, these memorials all have one thing in common – to honor babies who died before birth.  Whether the loss was by abortion, miscarriage or stillbirth, memorials also serve as part of the healing process for parents and loved ones of these babies.


St. Germaine, Prescott Valley, AZ

The National Memorial to the Unborn stands on the site of a former abortion clinic and now houses a pregnancy care center as well, where women can receive counseling, learn about alternatives to abortion and get real, practical help.


St. Germaine, Prescott Valley, AZ

Some memorials offer private services and placement of name plates,  small headstones or brick pavers to honor the child.  Others such as UnbornMemorials.com offer a place online for people to post memorials to their own or other’s unborn babies.  The Knights of Columbus are very pro-active in building memorials at Catholic parishes, such as the one where I took these pictures, St. Germaine in Prescott Valley, AZ.

As tragic as Roe vs. Wade (the US Supreme Court ruling that legalized abortion on demand) was, and as important as it is to continue to fight to overturn it, there will continue to be a deep-seated need to provide healing and resources to parents of aborted, miscarried and stillborn children.  Memorials to the unborn, support groups and other resources can help.

St. Germaine, Prescott Valley, AZ

To locate a memorial to visit or for further information on memorials to the unborn try these sites in addition to the links above:




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Compelling Interest – Review

http://christianaudio.com/compelling-interest-roger-resler-1

 

 

 

40 years after Roe vs. Wade, Compelling Interest, by Roger Resler offers an interesting look behind the scenes of the Supreme Court decision that made abortion legal in the United States.  From the appalling ignorance of the attorneys handling the defense, to the twisting of language and history to manipulate the court’s decision, Resler makes a convincing case for life.  In his interviews with experts and research into other historic court cases, the author demonstrates that the justices and defense attorneys allowed the legal team pursuing the “right” to legal abortion to bamboozle them.
In Resler’s reading of his audiobook, actual conversations with the founders of the National Right to Life Committee,  author and speaker Randy Alcorn, bioethics professor Dr. Gerard Magill, and other experts add objectivity and credence to a usually explosive topic.  Doctors’ descriptions of the abortion process at every stage of pregnancy are graphic and disturbing.
In the end, the key point I detected, was NOT whether the embryo, fetus, baby or “tissue” (as the attorney for the plaintiff chose to refer to it), was a living, human being.  The question of life starting at fertilization/conception had been scientifically and irrefutably proven long before this case came to trial.  The question before the court was whether this “tissue” had any “Constitutional Rights or protection” due to it.  Unfortunately, as no precedent had been established, the best the defense could come up with was that “natural born” citizens were due protection of life, liberty, etc. under the Constitution of the United States.  Sarah Weddington, attorney for the plaintiff, argued that this meant that since the “tissue” was not yet born, it had no rights.  The Supreme Court justices fell for it.
In the ensuing arguments about how early a fetus could survive outside the womb, “quality of life” issues were introduced.  Now we have a disturbing precedent.  If the “quality of life” that a premature baby can enjoy is not of the quality deemed necessary by the court, what about the “quality of life” of the disabled, the elderly, the poor?  It is frightening to see these very issues beginning to be addressed 40 years later.  
I don’t know about anyone else, but after giving birth to 4 children, I greatly respect the life that grows inside a woman’s womb, however conceived, and however little “hope” there is for “quality” for that life.  I also do not want anyone but my God deciding when my “quality of life” has ended and so, therefore, must my actual life.  
As a narrator, the author has a deep, commanding presence and the interspersed voices of experts he interviewed for the book offer a pleasant variety and help to keep the reader’s interest.
I do not recommend this book for anyone under the age of 16, due to the subject matter and graphic descriptions of the abortion process.   

 

 

By Roger Resler, © 2012

 

ISBN-10: 1618431137

 

ISBN-13: 978-1618431134

 

www.christianaudio.com       12.4 hrs.         $14.98

 

read by:  Roger Resler and various guests
 
Thank you to www.christianaudio.com for the opportunity to review this book.  A free copy was provided for that purpose, no other compensation was received.

 

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