Compelling Interest – Review

http://christianaudio.com/compelling-interest-roger-resler-1

 

 

 

40 years after Roe vs. Wade, Compelling Interest, by Roger Resler offers an interesting look behind the scenes of the Supreme Court decision that made abortion legal in the United States.  From the appalling ignorance of the attorneys handling the defense, to the twisting of language and history to manipulate the court’s decision, Resler makes a convincing case for life.  In his interviews with experts and research into other historic court cases, the author demonstrates that the justices and defense attorneys allowed the legal team pursuing the “right” to legal abortion to bamboozle them.
In Resler’s reading of his audiobook, actual conversations with the founders of the National Right to Life Committee,  author and speaker Randy Alcorn, bioethics professor Dr. Gerard Magill, and other experts add objectivity and credence to a usually explosive topic.  Doctors’ descriptions of the abortion process at every stage of pregnancy are graphic and disturbing.
In the end, the key point I detected, was NOT whether the embryo, fetus, baby or “tissue” (as the attorney for the plaintiff chose to refer to it), was a living, human being.  The question of life starting at fertilization/conception had been scientifically and irrefutably proven long before this case came to trial.  The question before the court was whether this “tissue” had any “Constitutional Rights or protection” due to it.  Unfortunately, as no precedent had been established, the best the defense could come up with was that “natural born” citizens were due protection of life, liberty, etc. under the Constitution of the United States.  Sarah Weddington, attorney for the plaintiff, argued that this meant that since the “tissue” was not yet born, it had no rights.  The Supreme Court justices fell for it.
In the ensuing arguments about how early a fetus could survive outside the womb, “quality of life” issues were introduced.  Now we have a disturbing precedent.  If the “quality of life” that a premature baby can enjoy is not of the quality deemed necessary by the court, what about the “quality of life” of the disabled, the elderly, the poor?  It is frightening to see these very issues beginning to be addressed 40 years later.  
I don’t know about anyone else, but after giving birth to 4 children, I greatly respect the life that grows inside a woman’s womb, however conceived, and however little “hope” there is for “quality” for that life.  I also do not want anyone but my God deciding when my “quality of life” has ended and so, therefore, must my actual life.  
As a narrator, the author has a deep, commanding presence and the interspersed voices of experts he interviewed for the book offer a pleasant variety and help to keep the reader’s interest.
I do not recommend this book for anyone under the age of 16, due to the subject matter and graphic descriptions of the abortion process.   

 

 

By Roger Resler, © 2012

 

ISBN-10: 1618431137

 

ISBN-13: 978-1618431134

 

www.christianaudio.com       12.4 hrs.         $14.98

 

read by:  Roger Resler and various guests
 
Thank you to www.christianaudio.com for the opportunity to review this book.  A free copy was provided for that purpose, no other compensation was received.

 

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblr

The Scent of Cherry Blossoms – Review

I don’t normally care for romances but I chose this one because of the Amish twist.  The Amish fascinate and inspire me.  Ms. Woodsmall does an excellent job of introducing and acquainting us with her main characters.  She is generous with information about them and their backgrounds.  She paints pictures of landscapes and situations that play like a movie in the imagination.

Annie comes from a broken Old Order Mennonite home in which her mother has struggled to raise several children amid the shame of her husband abandoning the family.  Aden’s Old Order Amish father and brother, Roman, were injured in a farming accident which left them unable to continue to provide for the family in quite the same way as before.  Annie’s struggles with her mother are emotionally charged.  Roman’s struggle to come to terms with his disability rings very true.  The way these people of faith handle their challenges and ultimately turn to their Creator to help and heal them is inspiring.  The problem of forbidden love between childhood friends Aden and Annie is resolved amid surprising twists and conflicts.

This is just a good old story, with characters who are real people with real problems, which today’s Old Order families are not immune to.  They have their warts and their roses (or should I say cherry blossoms?) and it is inspiring to see them grow and improve in the course of resolving their problems.  I really enjoyed this book. It’s a pleasant escape to Amish country and a “simpler” life.

Cindy Woodsmall is an award-winning and New York Times Bestselling author.  She has written several other books, including When the Soul Mends and Plain Wisdom.  Her friendships with Amish and Mennonites began in childhood and continue to this day.  She homeschooled her children as they were growing up.

Cassandra Campbell has recorded over 100 audiobooks and is an accomplished actress and high school teacher.  Her narration is clear and expressive without distracting from the story.

The Scent of Cherry Blossoms, “A romance from the heart of Amish country”, by Cindy Woodsmall, copyright 2012, audiobook narrated by Cassandra Campbell is available from  Christian Audio for $10.98.

22 chapters, 335 minutes (6 hours)

I would like to thank Christian Audio, for providing me with a free review copy of this audiobook.  No other compensation was received for this review.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblr