Beyond Dead, by Jordaina Sydney Robinson

Beyond Dead: A Bridget Sway Novel (A Paranormal Ghost Cozy Mystery Series) by [Robinson, Jordaina Sydney]

Bridget Sway is dead. But she’s finding out the afterlife is nothing like she expected. First, she finds out she has to start a new job, and then, she finds a dead dead guy in her locker. And then she gets to go find out what the new rules for her new life, or – death, are.

As a result, Bridget quickly decides to team up with dead private eye Sabrina to clear her name and find out who is killing these dead guys. Furthermore, she gets into all kinds of trouble with her parole officer, Oz, and doesn’t know if her new dead friends Pete and Charlie are friends or the murderers – out to get her next.

This story sounded so implausible, that I had to take a peek. I could not stop reading. The twists on the afterlife are terribly clever. I can’t wait to see how they carry on in the next book. I love a good cozy and this series promises to be unique and delightful. Thank you, Jordaina!

Beyond Dead, by Jordaina Sydney Robinson is available at Amazon.com, currently $.99.

No compensation was received for this review. I did receive a review copy from the author.

 

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Compelling Interest – Review

http://christianaudio.com/compelling-interest-roger-resler-1

 

 

 

40 years after Roe vs. Wade, Compelling Interest, by Roger Resler offers an interesting look behind the scenes of the Supreme Court decision that made abortion legal in the United States.  From the appalling ignorance of the attorneys handling the defense, to the twisting of language and history to manipulate the court’s decision, Resler makes a convincing case for life.  In his interviews with experts and research into other historic court cases, the author demonstrates that the justices and defense attorneys allowed the legal team pursuing the “right” to legal abortion to bamboozle them.
In Resler’s reading of his audiobook, actual conversations with the founders of the National Right to Life Committee,  author and speaker Randy Alcorn, bioethics professor Dr. Gerard Magill, and other experts add objectivity and credence to a usually explosive topic.  Doctors’ descriptions of the abortion process at every stage of pregnancy are graphic and disturbing.
In the end, the key point I detected, was NOT whether the embryo, fetus, baby or “tissue” (as the attorney for the plaintiff chose to refer to it), was a living, human being.  The question of life starting at fertilization/conception had been scientifically and irrefutably proven long before this case came to trial.  The question before the court was whether this “tissue” had any “Constitutional Rights or protection” due to it.  Unfortunately, as no precedent had been established, the best the defense could come up with was that “natural born” citizens were due protection of life, liberty, etc. under the Constitution of the United States.  Sarah Weddington, attorney for the plaintiff, argued that this meant that since the “tissue” was not yet born, it had no rights.  The Supreme Court justices fell for it.
In the ensuing arguments about how early a fetus could survive outside the womb, “quality of life” issues were introduced.  Now we have a disturbing precedent.  If the “quality of life” that a premature baby can enjoy is not of the quality deemed necessary by the court, what about the “quality of life” of the disabled, the elderly, the poor?  It is frightening to see these very issues beginning to be addressed 40 years later.  
I don’t know about anyone else, but after giving birth to 4 children, I greatly respect the life that grows inside a woman’s womb, however conceived, and however little “hope” there is for “quality” for that life.  I also do not want anyone but my God deciding when my “quality of life” has ended and so, therefore, must my actual life.  
As a narrator, the author has a deep, commanding presence and the interspersed voices of experts he interviewed for the book offer a pleasant variety and help to keep the reader’s interest.
I do not recommend this book for anyone under the age of 16, due to the subject matter and graphic descriptions of the abortion process.   

 

 

By Roger Resler, © 2012

 

ISBN-10: 1618431137

 

ISBN-13: 978-1618431134

 

www.christianaudio.com       12.4 hrs.         $14.98

 

read by:  Roger Resler and various guests
 
Thank you to www.christianaudio.com for the opportunity to review this book.  A free copy was provided for that purpose, no other compensation was received.

 

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The Sword – Review

Most of the world has been destroyed by a deadly virus, followed by a nuclear war. Technology is useless without the utilities and infrastructure to support it. Survivors are so widely dispersed that nearly all “modern” knowledge and convenience has disappeared. 400 years later, groups of people have organized into medieval style villages and countries, producing food on small farms and manufacturing all their clothing, tools, and weapons by hand.  If you’re a prepper, a survivalist, or just a fan of the fantasy genre like myself, you will truly enjoy “The Sword”, by Bryan M Litfin.

To these future humans, we are “the ancients”.  Worship of idols and corruption are not only rampant, but taught as the state religion.  While trying to escape from “outsiders”, Teo, a royal guardsman for the king of Chiveis, and Ana, a farm girl who saves his life, stumble upon an ancient book that turns out to be the Holy Bible.  As it is translated into their language, they come to know a new God, the Creator, whom they come to understand as the One True God.  Meanwhile, the High Priestess of the common religion takes steps to eliminate the new religion.  The ending is a compelling set up for Book 2 in this trilogy, The Gift.

The deep, resonant voice of narrator Ray Porter captures and holds the attention, while his softer, higher pitched female renditions are a bit humorous, while the listener adjusts to them.  Author Litfin succeeds in creating a future world that stands on its own in a genre which includes some tough competition.  His characters play convincingly, with all their flaws, admirable qualities, and inner struggles.  Ana eagerly embraces the new God, but Teo, accustomed to relying on his own strength and cunning, takes more than simple persuasion.  His road to conversion is fraught with disaster, and when he does come to believe, it may be too late for the fledgling community.

This book does have some mature scenes (without being explicit), so I would not recommend it for the family bookshelf, but I think it is appropriate for a mature 16 year old, and older, use your discretion.  It is entertaining, suspenseful, and illustrates what Christians must sometimes endure, especially in areas where the Word of God has never been heard.

The Sword, The Gift, and the third book in the trilogy, The Kingdom, are all available from www.christianaudio.com for $14.98 each.

Thanks to www.christianaudio.com  for providing me with a free review copy of “The Sword”.  No other compensation was received for this review.

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The Price of Truth – Review

 

How do solving mysteries and restoring vintage quilts go together?  Like needles and thread!  Kidding aside, when Guideposts Books puts together a series, you can bet it will be uplifting, inspirational and always interesting.  Sarah Hart is a vintage quilt restoration expert, and an avid quilter herself, who tends to get tangled up in one mystery after another.  In “The Price of Truth”, Sarah’s in Boston with her daughter-in-law, Maggie, an antique dealer, for an antique auction.  The Maple Hill Historical Society has asked Sarah to bid on a quilt they believe was owned by one of the town’s founders.  But there’s something fishy going on with the quilts at this auction.  Sarah has to find out if the desired quilt is even authentic, then discover why other quilts are selling for way above their value, before it goes up for bid.  Meanwhile, an elusive stranger keeps having secret meetings with the auction manager and Maggie’s best friend is having marital problems.  Read on as Sarah uncovers the mysteries of the quilts, helps Maggie’s friend rethink her divorce plans and saves an auction house’s reputation.

The Price of Truth is #20 in the Patchwork Mysteries Series from Guideposts Books.

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The Heavenly Man

China is a Communist country.  Christianity is illegal and those who preach it are cruelly treated.  If a family has one child already and is found to be expecting another, the mother is detained and the developing baby aborted.  If the mother manages to escape and have her baby, enormous fines and other punishments are imposed.  Bibles are confiscated and those who possess them are beaten.

When Brother Yun got his first Bible, he read it hungrily, memorizing everything he could, even sleeping with it.  He immediately began proclaiming the Good News of Jesus Christ in small villages across China.  From that moment on, he experienced persecution, torture and imprisonment by the Chinese government.  Brother Yun recounts his imprisonments, tortures and escapes in graphic detail.  Although there are those who question the extent of his reported tortures, his message is clear:  Jesus is love.  Jesus is everything.  Jesus’ love is worth dying for.  The way he handles his tormenters, never losing faith, is truly inspiring and heartrending.

In a country such as ours, where so many of us who call ourselves “Christian” are lukewarm at best, the mere thought of suffering torture, blood, pain and death for the sake of Jesus Christ gives pause.  Would I?  Could I?  Or would I deny Him and hide, gradually losing what little faith I had?  Not a dilemma I want to be faced with.  However, Brother Yun’s story causes me to question whether I am witnessing to Jesus Christ in my everyday life.  Do I hunger for the Eucharist and the Word?  When presented with the opportunity to attend Mass or read the Bible do I respond with enthusiasm?  Out of duty?  Turn my back?  Is my faith and hope contagious?  Do I radiate peace and love?  Good questions to keep in the front of my mind on a daily basis.  In the end, don’t we all want to be greeted with those precious words, “well done, good and faithful servant.  Now enter in and claim your reward.”?  Brother Yun concludes by challenging the Western Church to return to basics.  As the theme of this blog suggests, I think that’s a wonderful idea.
Christopher Jean gives a compelling reading as Brother Yun, with Jeannie Park as Yun’s faithful wife Deling.  The readers lend warmth and truth to their characters and the audiobook (copyright 2008 by Hovel Audio) is a joy to listen to.  The Heavenly Man, by Brother Yun, with Paul Hattaway, (c) 2002, was originally published by Monarch Books.
I would like to thank Christian Audio, for providing me with a free review copy of this audiobook.  No other compensation was received for this review.
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