Slow Travel with Children

slow travel with children

Many people are hesitant to travel with children at all, much less undertake slow travel with children. I confess that with my grown children I attempted to undertake a slow travel lifestyle, but chickened out after 6 months. It wasn’t the cost, which was far less than what it was costing us to live in California. Nor was it the stress. I think we all enjoyed the adventure and the closeness. It was simply ignorance. It made my parents uncomfortable and I worried that my ex, the children’s father, would object. In typical me fashion, I let my fears override my feelings and decided we had to put down roots. But I always look back on that time fondly. Great memories.

With my youngest, now 14, we began a full-time rving lifestyle when my mom was dying of leukemia in 2012. We packed up and moved in with my mom and dad for 6 months as she went through the dying process. I helped Dad with the funeral and all the stuff that came after, then we went back to our home base for about a year.

Next, the boy’s dad had to move in with his parents, to provide end-of-life care.  The next three years saw the boy and me traveling between grandparents and our home base in 3 states. In the mean time, my older children married and one moved to Colorado. We averaged about 4-6 weeks each stop in California or Colorado, with varying stays at points in between, including our home-base in Arizona and even the odd vacation to Texas, Oregon, Florida, or elsewhere. As homeschoolers (road-schoolers now) this worked for us. As a location independent crafter and writer, it also worked for me.

Although organized sports was out for us (praise be!), the boy had played ice hockey for a year, non-stop, before we started out and decided that kind of rigor was not for him. Nor for me, as it turns out. Not to mention the expense. That has not prevented us from trying new things. In Colorado, we did Tae-Kwon-Do for 6 weeks. We go shooting (guns) when we visit my daughter and her hubby. We also ride horses with them. We love fishing and hiking. We have a pool in my dad’s backyard (above ground). The boy has a new interest in archery and we have found a couple of great places for drop-in lessons, one for $15, the other $5. Wow. There are several archery ranges we can go to, to practice for free. I have decided to love this sport. And it is another one we can take with us wherever we go. I have transitioned from downhill to cross-country skiing. I much prefer the pace and the cost – free in most areas, if you have your equipment. We also keep our bikes handy, for exercise and transportation.

The boy and I have taken trains since he was an infant. He can probably navigate the Metro better than I can. He keeps in touch with friends online and we try to meet up with friends in whatever area we find ourselves.

Although taking short trips with children can get expensive and tedious, I have to say slow travel is fantastic and no more expensive than staying “home”. Whether you take your home with you, as in rving or living on a boat, or get long-term rentals, as in several weeks at a time, slow travel with children is a great life!

 

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Location Independence – What is it?

There is a phrase being bandied about these days, especially on travel blogs: location independence. But what is location independence, exactly? I submit that that depends entirely upon you. What is location independence to you?

First, let me back up.

The idea of location independence is a combination of freedom to live or travel anywhere independent of the source of your income.

california coast

Now back to our quandary. I love those images of the person sitting on the beach, with their computer (what about the sand?), sipping umbrella drinks. And then moving on to the next beach. In reality, it is more like finding a spot to rent (house or rv space or room), in a place where you can conduct your business, whether it be online, offline, handyman, nurse, craft fair, etc. Making sure you have all the resources you need to live your life and run your business there. Then, finally, finding that beach, or hiking trail or bistro to hang out at in your spare time.

To me, location independence also is the ability to move in with my dad as he ages, to assist him. The ability to home educate my youngest son; help care for my grandkids. To look forward to a time when my responsibilities will be less and my travels will take me farther. And not being locked into a location because I will lose my income if I am not there.

My point here is that location independence is not just about having lots of money and traveling the world. It is about being able to do those things that are important to you. Whether they involve travel, taking care of family, building homes for the poor, learning how to play the piano, or that occasional day on the beach with the umbrella drink. There are many ways to become location independent and not all of them involve working online.

So if this intrigues you, look at your current job and skills. Is there room for location independence there? You may be closer than you think.

I cover lots of ideas for location independence in my new book Escape the City and Thrive Book 3: Paying for the Dream. Hint: it’s not just for homesteaders. Available soon.

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Pikes Peak Cog Railway Adventure

pikes peak cog railway adventure

Pikes Peak Cog Railway,

located in Manitou Springs, Colorado, is a fantastic ride through dense spruce and aspen forests up to 14,000 feet. Our Pikes Peak Cog Railway Adventure started nearly 2 hours late. There were high winds on Pikes Peak, with gusts up to 90 mph. Because of this, we could only go up to 12,000 feet that day. We were given the option for a partial refund, or a reschedule. Since our tickets were comped and we had traveled nearly 200 miles, we opted to go ahead.

 

pikes peak cog rly gazebo          pikes peak cog rly stream

pikes peak cog rly sunlight thru trees

While waiting, we browsed the gift shop and snack bar. Tiny O2 canisters were available for those with altitude issues. This is the first time I’d seen them. What a clever idea! Downstairs from the covered seating areas we explored a little stream and enjoyed the shade.

Finally, our train pulled in.

pikes peak cog train

Our conductor, Elliot, was full of goofy tour guide jokes. And our engineer Nick did a great job driving the train up and back. I only had to talk to the man and the boy a couple of times about staying off their phones. The upward journey through the forest, with the heavy scent of pine wafting into the cars, was soothing. We passed several waterfalls, each accompanied by one of Elliot’s anecdotes. Pipe waterfall was particularly entertaining. The water falling out of a pipe…

 

pikes peak cog rly window crank

I think we had the best seats in the coach. Windows all around and right next to the engineer for the return trip. The side windows have hand cranks, just like the old automobiles. You can actually roll the windows down. The wooden seats are definitely not made for luxury.

 

pikes peak cogs

You can see the cogs down the middle of the tracks.

 

pikes peak cog rly hikers

Hikers can ride the train, too. I don’t know about the cost of that.

 

The train ride was so popular at one time that there were a couple of one-room hotels, which have collapsed and/or burned down since.

hydroelectric caretaker cabin

For many years there was a hydroelectric plant along the line and a caretaker lived in this cabin.

 

lake moraine from pikes peak

There is a beautiful view of Lake Moraine near the top of the pass. The lake supplies water to Colorado Springs.

 

windy point pikes peak

We had to stop at the Windy Point Station,

elevation 12,000 feet, due to gale force winds at the 14,000 ft. peak. The wind was blowing so hard that large sticks and numerous small items were picked up and flung over the train and station. We could feel the strong vibration of the wind when we put our hands on the windows.

 

cog railway car     cog railway outhouse

The Mountain View stop

at 10,000 ft has some interesting sights. There is an old train car, OUT house, and hiking trails which cross several streamlets. It felt nice to get off the train and stretch our legs. We had time for a bit of hiking and photo ops with some interesting scenery.

 

colorado springs from pikes peak

At one point you can even see the city of Colorado springs in the distance.

 

pikes peak train

Descending through the trees

gently brought us back to reality. The October weather had been so mild, and the sun so welcome, despite the wind, that we all felt our Pikes Peak Cog Railway Adventure was over too soon.

Check out our YouTube video on this post. To plan your trip click here: Pikes Peak Cog Railway.

 

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Arroyo Seco, New Mexico via Rio Grande Gorge Bridge

arroyo seco, new mexico

From our spot in southern Colorado, we cut across US Highway 64 to enjoy a scenic drive past Earthship Biotecture communities. Spectacular is the only way to describe the view from the Rio Grande Gorge Bridge. Our destination for the day, Arroyo Seco, New Mexico.

rio grande gorge bridge

We didn’t stop to photograph the Earthship homes but they are private residences anyway, so that might have been rude. We did stop to take pictures on the bridge, however.

rio grande gorge steel bridge

Awarded “Most Beautiful Steel Bridge” in the Long Span category in 1966, it was dubbed the “bridge to nowhere” during construction because there were no funds to finish the road on the other side. The Rio Grande river runs from southern Colorado to Mexico. About 10 miles outside of Taos, it flows through a 50 mile long, 800-foot deep canyon created by earthquakes millions of years ago. From the top, it is hard to imagine that the gorge is home to a rich and diverse ecosystem. Petroglyphs are evidence of early human habitation. There are also supposed to be hidden hot springs and ruins. Consequently, I will need to return in warmer weather to investigate.

la santisima church arroyo seco nm

The town of Arroyo Seco, New Mexico was originally settled on a Spanish land grant, in 1745. The historic church, La Santisima Trinidad, occupies a prominent place in the town. Arroyo Seco currently caters to tourists and retirees. Only 7 miles from Taos, it is a convenient stop for skiers and hikers. Get home cooked burritos and burgers at tiny convenience stores and food stands along the main drag. Boutique shops feature local artisans and upscale gifts.

arroyo seco, new mexico mercantile     asnm mercantile pottery      asnm mercantile antiques

Arroyo Seco Mercantile

carries everything from antiques to handcrafted soaps to toys. Seems like the shelves are bursting with color.

asnm mercantile candles     arroyo seco nm mercantile storefront

A tiny garden

next to the Mercantile offers a picnic table, benches, and waterfalls, in addition to a reconstructed log cabin dating to the 1860’s. Our visit fell during the Christmas season, and the garden was decked out with a nativity scene and Christmas bells.

arroyo seco, new mexico mercantile garden nativity

Francesca’s Clothing Boutique

carries reasonably priced and southwestern flavored apparel.

asnm francescas clothing boutique     francescas clothing boutique

We didn’t browse half the shops but there is certainly something for everybody in Arroyo Seco, New Mexico. Handwoven rugs, pottery, fine art, and jewelry are just a few that we missed. For more info, you can visit the Arroyo Seco website.

 

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Tropical Palms RV Campground, Kissimmee, Florida

rv campground, kissimmee, florida

We found Tropical Palms RV Campground, Kissimmee, Florida through our Passport America membership. We just needed a spot for 2 nights, while we took in nearby Universal Studios, but once there, we wished we could have stayed for more.

tiny homes tropical palms fl

The RV spaces are clean and easy-in-easy-out. Mostly pull through. There is also a large section of tiny homes for rent. Several parks dot the complex, including a dog park, and there is a full-size pool, a kiddie pool, and a Jacuzzi. The laundry area is ample and the machines well maintained. The bathrooms are also very clean, with nice showers.

yak in pool, tropical palms, fl

We found dealing with the office personnel very pleasant. A staff member escorted us to our site, in a golf cart. We had plenty of 4G and were too busy during our 2 days there to really need the free wifi, so I can’t tell you how good it is. But in most cases that depends on how close you are to the signal, and how many people are on it.

tropical palms, fl dive in movie

Sitting outside under our awning was most pleasant, as the bugs were not bad. The swimming pool was convenient, right next to the laundry room, so we enjoyed several hours of splashing and swimming. Sadly, we were not there long enough to partake of the Toucan Café, the Friday night dive-in movie, or the many other activities taking place at the resort.

toucan cafe snack stand

We don’t normally care for RV parks and were happy to leave when the space next to us filled up. Despite this, Tropical Palms definitely gets 2 thumbs up. We will definitely stay there again. Especially in the off-season (if there is such a thing in Florida) when the crowds are gone.

For more info, check out the Tropical Palms website.

Tropical Palms RV Campground and Resort

2650 Holiday Trail, Kissimmee, FL 34746

  877-570-2267

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