Creekside City Park, Sisters, Oregon

creekside park
creekside city park, sisters, oregon

We took the rv for a test drive to Creekside City Park, Sisters, OR after it came back from having the transmission repaired. We wanted to give it a good distance test with some mountain climbing. It did just great and we had a nice day trip.

mountains in oregon
on way to sisters, oregon

We meandered through the mountains and stopped here for a bit of exploring. At Sisters, we found Creekside City Park, where we pulled in for lunch. There is also a campground there. Creekside is nice and green (like most of Oregon) and has lots of shady trees. There are picnic tables but no barbeques and there seems to be a lack of trash cans. I ended up putting our trash in the dumpsters, inconveniently fenced off. At least they had doggie doo bags and scoopers. Of course, Mrs. Susie was on her own doggie dude ranch vacation back in Colorado.

creekside park
bridge at creekside city park, sisters, or

From the picnic area you cross the covered bridge to get to the bathrooms in the camping area. The bridge is an impressive work of art, sturdily built and beautiful to look at. We trekked down to the creek and dipped our toes. I found it very relaxing to close my eyes and listen to the gentle burble of the stream which seemed to wash away all my cares. Wanting to share this experience with my companions, I dragged them down to the creek and made them sit and listen with closed eyes, also. They giggled and squirmed and didn’t get it. I guess you just have to mentally be in a certain place to appreciate it. I tried.

butterfly
this poor guy got stuck to our radiator

At a stretch stop on the way back to Portland, we found this pretty critter stuck to our front grill. He was still barely alive when we peeled him off, but didn’t survive long.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblr

Ballard Locks, Washington

ballard locks
yacht and kayaks going through Ballard Locks, Seattle, WA

About an hour drive from where we were visiting in Tacoma, WA is Ballard Locks. The official name is Hiram M. Chittendom Locks, but I don’t think anybody knows that.

Botanical Gardens, Ballard Locks, WA
Carl S. English, Jr., Botanical Gardens, Ballard Locks

Ballard Locks is more than just a shipping channel. On the shore are beautiful gardens, with rare trees and plants. Parks to sit and watch the activity on the locks, have a picnic, or roll down the gentle slopes, as a number of children (and adults) were doing. There is also a walking path through the gardens and a museum. We had a personal tour guide: Tim, a ranger, took us around and pointed out features of the gardens and locks.  He pointed out ginko trees, dawn redwoods and sequoias in the gardens.

ballard locks, seattle, wa
waiting for the locks to open

He showed us the difference between the stronger, original cement and gravel construction of the buildings and the newer cement benches, which were already cracked and crumbling. He explained how the locks functioned as we watched them in action.

fish ladders, ballard locks, seattle, wa
fish ladders, salmon “climb” from puget sound into fresh water to spawn

He showed us the fish ladders where the salmon migrate from their ocean home, back to fresh waters to spawn. Cables, much like clotheslines, are strung across the locks to protect the spawning salmon and smolts from seagulls and other predatory birds.

going with the flow
sign explaining smolt slides, which enable young salmon to return to the ocean

We watched as kayakers paddled through the locks from fresh water into Puget Sound and yachts motored from Puget Sound through the locks.

stainless steel sculpture
Salmon Waves, by Paul Sorey, Stainless Steel sculpture, Ballard Locks

Even sculptures are displayed at the locks.

Across the dam, there is an underwater viewing area, where you can watch the locks and fish ladders, if you’re lucky you’ll see some fish. Of course, it helps if you’re there during spawning season.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblr

Traveling With Monster Cat

 

Cat on the computer
Mr. Cuddles poses on the computer
Mr. Cuddles was irresistable. Of all the kittens available for adoption from Petsmart in Flagstaff, Arizona that day, he was the calmest and most responsive. His gray coat, with white socks and tuxedo shirt, was gorgeous and soft. He had already been adopted once, but regretfully returned due to severe allergies. I sometimes wonder about that one.
cat in tiny trailer
Mr. C’s favorite spot in the tiny trailer
Thankfully, all the cats at Petsmart had to be fixed, litter box trained and current with vaccinations. He even came with coupons for free cat food and treats. We took Mr. Cuddles home and let him explore the house at the Homestead. He inspected the wood pile next to the woodstove. He sat in every windowsill. He growled and hissed at Mrs. Susie. He found his favorite spot, on top of the futon bunk in the living room. Our next destination was California. It was with regret that we locked Mr. Cuddles in his cat carrier, but with his tenuous relationship with Mrs. Susie at this point, we didn’t have a choice. Every couple of hours we stopped to stretch our legs and theirs. Mr. Cuddles proved himself adept at slipping out of his harness, but the boy easily caught him every time. Finally, in California, we were able to let him out to roam around my dad’s house.
dog and cat on leash
Cuddles and Susie going for a walk
Here, he found a new sort of mischief to undertake. We would bring dog and cat into the guest room overnight, so that we wouldn’t have to worry about them throwing wild animal parties with my son’s pit bull and his wife’s cat. The problem being, that when he wanted out, he would jump up on the door and claw his way down. This made my dad none too happy. Since he performed this mischief early in the morning, we would let him out. He soon discovered Simba, who would sleep with my son and his wife. Now he would jump and claw their door to get Simba to come out and play. This would result in him getting tossed back into the guest room and the whole pattern would repeat itself until everyone was up and about. Thankfully, this was just a phase.
MeToo
Tiny trailer and Susie at Goose Island SP, Texas
We moved on to Texas, where Mr. Cuddles made himself at home in our tiny trailer. He led us on some merry chases in our campsite, before we got a recommendation on a harness which might better contain him. We found one at Petco and it worked like a charm. It is much more pleasant to travel with animals (and children), when you are not constantly having to chase them.
new tiny home
The new digs – feels like a mansion!
As much as we loved our tiny 14 foot trailer, with a dog, a cat, a full sized adult and a tween boy, life became much more bearable when we upgraded to our 26 foot home. Mr. Cuddles now had plenty of room to roam and no one was sleeping on top of the cat litter box, never mind that the pine pellet litter controls the odor much better than clay cat litter. He and Susie had finally become bosom buddies and he is now able to travel without being locked in the carrier. He still doesn’t like walking on the harness, but at least it gets him outside once in awhile. He still tries to use the walls for scratching posts, but we are working on that. No, he hasn’t caused any noticeable damage to our walls.
cat and boy
the boy and his cat
He likes to pounce on our feet when we are in bed. In winter, the blankets are thick enough that this is an amusing game. In summer, it is a grievous annoyance. Even with a folded up blanket over my feet, he sometimes gets me with a claw. Game over! Mr. Cuddles’ newest trick is opening the screen door. We like to leave the door open for extra light and fresh air. Mr. Cuddles loves to sit and look out the screen. He soon discovered that he can jump up and hang on the lever to get it open. Now we are looking for a lock, but in the meantime, no more leaving the door open.
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblr

Mt. St. Helens National Monument, Washington

SAM_1159

Mount Saint Helens National Monument is an easy day trip from either Portland, Oregon or Seattle, Washington. From Portland we headed up the freeway through thick forests and past numerous rivers, streams, and lakes. Once on the road heading up the mountain, you can see the numerous areas that had to be evacuated in the days leading up to the eruption in 1980 (the mountain is a volcano). At least one old mountain man refused to leave his cabin, knowing that he was not long for this world anyway, and preferring to die on his mountain. There are many stopping places in between, but we waited until we were in the Mt. St. Helens area to stop for lunch. The visitor’s center at Hoffstadt Bluffs is nestled in a small valley just below the volcano. There are viewing areas, picnic tables, and a nice, grassy knoll, perfect for children (and some adults) to roll down. You can walk down to the river or sit in the sun outside the café next to the visitor’s center. This gift shop is very limited, but it is the only one open in late April, so we made do.
SAM_1166
We continued all the way up to Johnston Ridge Observatory, where a ranger was giving a talk, despite the facilities being closed. We walked part of the trail, but only a little ways. This was an outing with abuelo, so no extreme hiking today. Much of the trail is paved, but there is a longer version that turns to dirt and gravel. We’re saving that for next time.
SAM_1176
Watching the clouds play around the mountain was fascinating. At one point, a cloud formation made it look like the cinder cone was actually steaming! But it finally shifted and we could tell it was just clouds. Our pulses raced for a few moments.
SAM_1186
On the way down, we stopped for an early dinner at The Birth of a Lake Trail. This lake was formed as a result of the 1980 blast and is still protected as it continues to grow and nurture water and plant life. The crystal clear blue waters sparkle in the sunlight. Spiders spin their webs unmolested. The trail goes most of the way around the lake, with plenty of stops for sitting and viewing.
SAM_1189
Abuelo and Tia did a good section of this trail with his walker/chair. After a couple hours of relaxation at this quiet spot (until the guy with the leaf blower showed up) we continued back to busy Portland, scenes of mountainous beauty and visions of the frightening power of nature filling our minds to be pulled forth for future mental getaways.
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblr

The Chinese Garden, Portland, Oregon

IMG_0751
Every big city that I have visited has its hidden escapes. Portland, OR is no exception. One such delight is the Chinese Garden, in the heart of downtown. Surrounded by high rises and parking meters, one does not expect to be swept away to a natural sanctuary, but procure your ticket and enter the garden gate.
SAM_1062
Everything about the Chinese Garden is intentional. It is designed to transport you from everyday life. Step into the Courtyard of Tranquility and shed the cares of the world. Fill your eyes with the wonders of rock formations and waterfalls. Breathe in the heady scents of multitudes of flowers. Let the soothing sounds of the water and the birds and the breeze melt away your anxieties. Feel the warm sun on your shoulders (okay, so the sun does, indeed, come out in Portland) and the cool tiles under your feet.
SAM_1070
There is an order and a flow to the garden. Windows and doorways frame views, guiding the eye from one peaceful scene to the next. Enter the Hall of Brocade Clouds and admire the wealth of your hosts. Carved ginko wood panels, ornate furniture and food offerings to the ancestors fill the hall. Proceed to the Terrace and take in an overview of the garden, patterned after the city compounds of wealthy Chinese families who wanted to live with the comforts of the city, but also wanted to surround themselves with the beauty of nature.
SAM_1067
Knowing the Fish Pavilion has lots of shade and seating for gazing at the koi which populate the lake. Many of the fascinating and unique rock formations and most of the garden’s building materials came from China. Reflections in Clear Ripples is the name of the lounge house, or game room. Visitors can try out a game of Chinese Fortune Sticks and keep their fortune. Yet another pavilion, Flowers Bathing in Spring Rain, offers sweeping views of the lake and garden.
SAM_1105
I sat in the Scholar’s Courtyard and soaked up the sun while I ate my lunch. Inhaling deeply of the spring blossoms, I listened to the water falling gently down the rocks across the lake. I listened to birds singing and arguing. I pondered human nature as I observed 2 women, frowning and gossiping about my friend, who took a phone call from her brother inside the Scholar’s Study, discussing our trip here with their dad, my son’s 91 year old abuelo. Such is the nature of the Chinese Garden. It is a place to think deeply and also a place to let your thoughts take flight. The Scholar’s Study is interesting. Writing implements and accessories are on display along with several piles of scrolls. Buddha boards are set up with water and brushes for visitors to practice Chinese characters.
SAM_1109
The Moon Locking Pavilion would be the place to stand on a clear, moonlit night. The reflection of the moon is said to be locked in by the pavilion’s shadow. Relax with a steaming cup of tea, served in traditional Chinese cups from delicate porcelain teapots, in The Tower of Cosmic Reflections. The Rock Mountain and Waterfall crown the tour of the Chinese garden, followed by Painted Boat in Misty Rain, the final pavilion. Inside its boat shape you are meant to feel like you’re being gently rocked on the water.
SAM_1112
Rather than proceed out through the gate, we decided to wander leisurely back through the gardens. Stopping and enjoying each view once again and drinking in the tranquility before returning to the craziness of the city.
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblr